Relocation is a very stressful process for us people. Just try and imagine how it feels for our little furry children – our pets. Animals are very prone to anxiety when it comes to situations like these. They simply cannot understand what’s happening and because we’re unable to explain, our pets usually get extremely anxious and even depressed during relocation. And while dogs may be a bit more accustomed to the prospect of traveling, cats represents the real problem here – they are extremely territorial and hate having to change their habitat. It confuses them and makes them very stressed out, which is not good for their health. We, as their owners, are the only ones capable of making this experience as positive as possible for them. There are certain steps that you can take in order to ensure a stress-free relocation for your pets.

This blog will cover the most essential things you should know if you’re planning on moving abroad with your pets, such as the documentation you need and the steps you should take. Let’s assume that you and your entire family will be moving somewhere across the ocean very soon and that you’ve decided to take your pet with you. No matter whether it’s a cat or a dog or an exotic pet, they can get very anxious during transportation. If you’re traveling across the ocean, you will most certainly travel by plane. There are certain things that you should know when it comes to flying with animals, which will also be covered in this blog. Let’s begin.

Step 1: Make sure that you get familiar with your destination’s policy on importing pets

If you have an exotic pet, you might not be able to take him with you. Certain countries have restricted certain species from living there, mainly for safety reasons. This is also true when it comes to dogs, as there are several breeds which are thought to be dangerous to be around and have therefore been prohibited. Here’s a list of some of the banned dog breeds:

Poland

  •         Pitbull Terrier (allowed only with effective precautions)

Germany

  •         American Pitbull Terrier
  •         American Staffordshire Terrier
  •         Staffordshire Bull Terrier
  •         English Bull Terrier

Denmark

  •         American Pitbull Terrier
  •         American Staffordshire Terrier
  •         American Bulldog
  •         Alabai
  •         Tosa Inu
  •         Kangal
  •         Caucasian Shepherd Dog
  •         Tornjak
  •         Fila Brasileiro (Brazilian Mastiff)
  •         South-Russian Shepherd
  •         Yugoslavian Shepherd Dog
  •         Mixes and hybrids of these breeds

Spain

  •         American Pitbull Terrier
  •         American Staffordshire Terrier
  •         Dogo Argentino
  •         English Bull Terrier
  •         Staffordshire Bull Terrier
  •         Rottweiler
  •         Akita inu
  •         Fila Brasileiro (Brazilian Mastiff)
  •         Tosa Inu

Great Britain

  •         American Pitbull Terrier
  •         Dogo Argentino
  •         Fila Brasileiro (Brazilian Mastiff)
  •         Tosa Inu

Ireland

  •         American Pitbull Terrier
  •         English Bull Terrier
  •         Akita Inu
  •         Bullmastiff
  •         Doberman Pinscher
  •         Staffordshire Bull Terrier
  •         German Shepherd Dog
  •         Rhodesian Ridgeback

Please note that this list does NOT include all of the countries which currently have a ban on certain dog races. Some of these breeds are considered to be dangerous and most countries have either introduced a ban on possession or importing, or they have certain restrictions for keeping them. The main purpose of these laws is to prevent injuries and deaths caused by dog bites.

Source: https://petolog.com/articles/banned-dogs.html

Step 2: Make sure you have all the necessary documentation

This needs to be done before your relocation date. Most of these documents can be easily obtained at a veterinary’s office. Here’s what you will need:

  •        Rabies tags – most states require your pet to be vaccinated against rabies. This includes dogs, cats and some exotic pets.
  •        Permits – or passport, you might need to get this too before you can safely fly with your pet. You can ask your vet about the application process. The procedure is fairly simple. You will only need to schedule an appointment with your vet in order to see if your pet is healthy and whether it needs certain vaccines or boosters.
  •        Health certificates – almost all states will require you to provide a health certificate before you can board the plane. Sick pets will not be allowed on board, or into the cabin area. Pets who are sick will probably have to travel inside of the cargo area.

Step 3: Make sure to pick an airline with allows pets on board and get familiar with their safely regulations

There are several ways in which your pet can travel with you:

  •        Checked Baggage Cabin: Pets traveling in the cabin must fly with an adult passenger and travel in an airline compliant carrier stowed under the seat.
  •        Checked Baggage Cargo: Pets traveling with a passenger that are not permitted in the cabin can be transported as checked baggage in the cargo hold.
  •        Manifest Cargo: Unaccompanied or very large pets will travel as manifest cargo in the hold.
  •        Service/Comfort Animals: Service and Emotional Animals can travel in the cabin with a disabled passenger on many airlines.

Many airlines will provide you with a pet carrier. However, make sure that you check this information before you arrive at the airport. Also, make sure that you check which documents you exactly need in order to be able to travel with your pet.

Step 4: Here’s a complete list of everything you’ll need

  •         Documents – Everything you pet might need in order to leave the country and enter a new one
  •         Vaccine Certificates – This can be easily obtained at your local vet office
  •         Microchip – Certain countries require your pet to be microchipped, so make sure you get that sorted out before you depart
  •         ID tags – Make sure that your pet wears a collar with an ID tag! This will ensure you that, in case it gets lost during transportation, you will be able to get it back.

·            A pet carrier for the airplane – if the airline you’re flying does not provide these for you, you will have to make sure that you have your own pet carrier in order to avoid any problems.

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